Project Update

Bolt Action – I have plans for a panzerpioneer platoon for Bolt Action and have scored some armored infantry & a Panzer IVh model!  I am doing some light conversions on these to give some of the panzergrenadiers camouflage smocks and helmet covers.  The Warlord Games German halftracks are fantastic models!

Warriors of Chaos – I am revising several of my Warrior units to add some large model unit fillers to bulk out these units.  I also am aiming to getting my blood Demonprince finally painted!!

11th Hussars for Flames of War – The 14 odd Humbar and Daimler armored cars for my British in the Desert army are mostly assembled.  These should be a blast to play.  I need to finalize my 1500 point list and get some games in while I am painting this.

PAVN for Flames of War ‘Nam – I’ve been painting a bit of PAVN armor which has been fun.  What I really need to do at some point is to get my support teams for the infantry locked down.  I have some materials for some Vietnam Terrain as well which  needs to be built.

Slannesh Chaos Space Marines – I got these guys up to a table basic paint scheme for Adepticon, but they are taking a back burner until I get some of these other items settled.  They are off to a great start however so I can’t wait to continue on them.

Flames of War: Soviet DShK AA Truck

DSHK5

I recently completed an anti-aircraft platoon for my Soviet Army.  I have always been a fan of this model and when I had faced Soviet players in the past found that the AA gun mounted on the back of a truck really added a unique element to an otherwise rubber-stamped feeling army.

Defensive tactics

One thing that I like about this unit is that it is actually very versatile.  I have found that I really appreciate anything in FoW that can fill several roles or can be modified to fit a scenario before the game starts.  Obviously this platoon can be used to scare of aircraft… it’s an AA unit, but thanks to the mobility of the truck that it is mounted on and FoW’s ‘portee’ rules, this unit has some utility if there are no aircraft around.  The gun team can dismount and become a AA man packed gun team.  This feature of the unit allows AA gun teams to integrate with an infantry force nicely.  As man packed gun teams the dismounted DShKs can be dug in to a Strelkovy line to add defensive fire support, or help hold an objective.  The fact that one of the platoon’s gun teams is the platoon commander gives a small buff to the unit as the command team cannot be isolated by enemy fire (priority target: infantry teams).  The DShK is a a proper heavy machine-gun.  Being part of the .50 family it has an AT of 4 and a firepower of 5+.  This means that it can be a threat to armored cars, light tanks, and even medium tanks in defensive fire.

DSHK1

Offensive tactics

On the attack the DShK can contribute a bit to shooting out dug in infantry as well.  Its better than 6 firepower and it’s 4 rate of fire give it a slight edge over other infantry weapons for shooting teams in bulletproof cover.  If dismounted these guys can keep up with an infantry advance, or if kept on their trucks, they can act as an additional maneuver unit.  The platoon has only 3 teams, so they are very fragile and can be an easy kill for your opponent.  This shouldn’t be underestimated.  It would be easy to accidentially throw these guys away, and unless you are gaining the benefit of saving shots from something more critical by sacrificing the AA MG Platoon, getting them shot off the table for no reason really needs to be avoided (duh… easier said than done).

DSHK4

Great fit for all lists

Most AA units in FoW are very cheap, but this one is a bargain points-wise even by those standards.  At 60 points they are an easy fit to round out an army, bringing you up to an even amount of platoons.  If you can neutralize a light armored attack or an airstrike they quickly start earning those points in your list.  If you can use them to jump a target of opportunity, or support an attack on an objective then you really are seeing them prove their worth.

DSHK2

Building & painting the models

As I had mentioned before I like the way this unit adds a visual dimension to the rest of a Soviet Army.  Having a couple of trucks in an infantry or armored battalion really adds character.  I opted to employ the popular technique of magnetizing the gun to the base via a sub-base made with a bit of the plastic from the blister that the unit came in.   The sub base has a bit of metal in it which allows it to stick to magnets mounted in the base as well as the bed of the truck.  If I were to do this unit again, I would use larger magnet – the magnetization as is not isn’t very strong.  The 1/8th” magnets I used are adequate for the job, but it would be possible to shake the gunner loose from the base or truck with little effort.

I avoided adding grass to the sub-base, but did paint it brown and texture it with sand.  The goal here was to create a surface which wouldn’t be dramatically out of place on both the truck bed and the actual gun team base.  I may pull more highlights out of the greens in the truck paint scheme.  On the fence with that at the moment.  I opted to mount the truck to a base to give it a bit more stability.  I don’t usually do this with my vehicles, but I think that I will be from now one with the ones that have separate metal wheels.    It really helps the truck feel finished and keeps it stable on the gaming surface.

DSHK4

Flames of War V3 observations

In the back of the V2 Flames of War rulebook is a very handy synopsis of the game’s core rules.  This guide was a fantastic way for players to get to grips with the basics of the game’s rules, and to look up particulars while playing.  Recently Battlefront has posted a link on their site to the Flames of War Quick Reference Guide for V3!  I’ve been checking this out, and while the changes are subtle, I can see how they will drastically affect how the game is played in the future.  Here are a few of the items which jumped out at me:

  • Wheeled vehicle movement is increased in most cases.  Armored cars are no longer wildly inferior to their tracked counterparts.  Jeeps and motorcycles move 16″ standard.  Wheeled vehicles now move 12″ over open ground, and faster on roads!  I believe that agile, but delicate armored car forces may now appear in games more often.  This certainly gives me incentive to field my 11th Hussars force for Mid War some day.
  • Smoke ammo is more effective for those guns and vehicles which get it.  A smoke shot must be fired first, drops two smoke markers, and blinds teams more effectively than before.
  • Recce vehicles, and Gone to Ground gun teams (man packed only?) receive a 3+ save.  This is a clear effort to create some parity for these teams with other elements in the game.  This will probably help make them more common on the table-top.
  •  When firing artillery with a large amount of guns, the firer can often choose between re-rolling misses, or getting a larger template.  This scales up to the massive devastating bombardments that rocket launchers are fond of doing.  What was once a British national rule is now a general tactic.  I love it!
  • There are a ton of changes in the assault phase.  Defensive fire needs to be planned more carefully thanks to the 8″ bubble rule.
  • Getting one or two teams into contact doesn’t allow the entire platoon (or company – people who have faced off against Strelkovy know what I am talking about) to advance.  Only teams within 8″ can now try to contribute to an assault.  I have heard that units with ‘quality of quantity’ have this region extended to 12″.
  • Gun teams have circumstances where they can attack tank teams in an assault.
  • Those very same gun teams are likely to be lost if their side has to fall back during an assault.
  • Aggressive teams from the winning side can force enemy teams back thanks to a 2″ push back zone that is applied to the teams which fell back.  This will be handy to force platoons off objectives, or out of advantageous terrain.
  • Tank Terror is now actually called Tank Terror.
  • AA fire now has 8″ extra range when shooting at aircraft.
  • Airplanes don’t need to roll to range in if their targets are more than 2″ away from woods or buildings.  I love this rule.  It is very effective at representation, and while I am bummed out that it may be easier for Typhoons, and P-40s to knock out my panzers, it will be historically accurate when I hide them in the woods for the first several turns of the game.

The above certainly aren’t all the changes, and many of which have details and caveats that I am missing without reading the actual rulebook.  Based on these changes I am pretty excited about V3.  I think its going to be a good ruleset. 

If you find any misinterpretations in the above post, my bad!  I am writing this giddily after an initial perusal of the new quick reference guide. 

V3 News from Battlefront

Flames of War LogoAs many of you know, Battlefront is about to release Flames of War version 3.  Check out this video for some news about the new books, and the sweet freebie that our Kiwi friends are giving to folks who own a copy of V2.

Initially I was very worried when I heard that V3 was coming out.  I felt this way because I am very fond of the version 2 rules, and can think of little that I would change.  Now that I have heard some of the rumors about what is likely to change, and how, I am very excited about the new edition!  It’s going to be quite a hustle to get up on these prior to Adepticon, but the rest of the group is chomping at the bit as well, so I imagine that the spring will be replete with the sound of tank engines, machine-gun fire, and exploding artillery shells!

Say what you want about various game companies, their supporters (fan-boys), and detractors (whine-asses), but I am often impressed by Battlefront’s ability to rock!  I guess this makes me a fan-boy!  😀

Some painted minis…

I recently learned a bit more about how to use my camera, editing RAW photos, and purchased a new set of lights. This has inspired me to take some photos of my recent miniature work to get a bit better at taking photos. Check ’em out!

Not much of my Warmachine stuff is painted. I did manage to paint these deliverers and one of the heavy jacks for my Menoth army. These guys were a lot of fun to paint, and I hope I can get into the rest of the army some day.

Here are a bunch of units for my US 3rd Armor army for Flames of War. At the moment I am focusing on Germans for my practice, and tournaments, but I will always have a soft spot for the G.I.s!

Flames of War Sherman tank

Stuart tanks for Flames of WarStuarts! These tanks rock in the game, and these were fun to paint. They are a bit of a conversion job. I rebuilt their barrels out of wire, and greenstuff, as well as added some bits of detail in putty to give them a more well used look. The decals on all of these vehicles really look great if you use some green to make them look chipped up, and slightly covered with dirt.

US 105mm Artillery Cannon

US 105mm BatteryThis is one of my two artillery batteries that I have for my US Flames of War army. I also have a 155mm battery to accompany these boys!

SS Tank Hunters

Here are some WIP shots of my SS Tank Hunters/Scouts.

I am still learning how to use the new camera.  Hint: I need more light.

Since I have wrapped up this platoon, I have begun on the army’s HQ section, and 1st platoon.  I have made the camo a bit more detailed, and covering a greater area.  I think its looking a bit more accurate than on these guys.  Not that I am disappointing with the results above.  These guys are going to be part of my army for Adepticon!

Base marking in Flames of War

Anyone who has played a handful of games of Flames of War has probably noticed that it is easy to mix up teams between platoons.  The problem is that when you are looking down at your infantry teams, gun teams, and in some cases even tank teams, everything tends to look the same (they are wearing something called a uniform after all).  This can cause issues in the game when you need to remove teams as casualties, determining which platoon has what weapon attachment, or how many teams are in a platoon when it can take it’s defensive fire shots against an assaulting platoon.  Most of these issues come up with infantry companies which have platoons which are deployed interwoven, or simply next door to another platoon.  It can be very easy to mix up which team is with what platoon.

There are loads of ways to mark your units to help alleviate the problems above, and here I am going to show you some of my favorite methods.  The easiest thing to do, and what I tend to do with each of my armies in Flames of War is to come up with a simple marking system for the edges of your bases.  I have seen some people put little dots on the edges of bases with permanent markers, the number of dots showing what unit a team is part of, but I think you can push this method a little farther.  I tend to paint a wide region on the back left side of the base with white paint.  I will put one or more colored dashes to illustrate which platoon the team belongs to.  The colors and number of dashes that you use to mark the teams can vary in any way you find appealing.  For example I will mark my combat platoons with red dashes, but a different number for each platoon.  1st platoon would have 1 red dash, 2nd 2 re dashes, ect.  A weapons platoon would get orange, blue, or other color dashes in the same way.

On the white background, these colored dashes really stand out, and are very easy to read.

Another step that I like to take is to make an additional mark, sometimes on the right side of the base to mark a special unit.  My PAVN Infantry Companies have many RPG teams in them, and it is important to me that I don’t position them incorrectly, or remove them as casualties before I want to.  These teams get an additional mark on the right hand side of the base to help them stand out from the rest of the company.  Teams such as command teams usually don’t get any additional marking as they are pretty easy to identify from a distance based on their base-size.  This method is very easy to do, and makes keeping your teams organized very easy.

US gun team with base marking
This infantry team is part of the 2nd platoon.
The dark blue dash next to the platoon identifier shows that this is a RPG team.

Another method, one favored by my good friend Jason is to give the bases some special detail which will identify them from one another.  His US Paratroopers combat platoons have either pumpkins (made from greenstuff) or tombstones (made from plasticard) which identify them as either 1st or 2nd platoon.  This method, while taking a bit of extra work adds a lot of character, and appeal to a platoon.  At 15mm, the base of an infantry team is effectively half the model, so extra work put into bases is never wasted.  This subtle method can also be used creatively to give an overall theme to your army, much in the way that Jason gave his US paratroopers a Halloween theme.

US Paratroopers (Tombstone Platoon) by Jason Misuinas

The two primary platoons of Jason’s US paratroopers are defined by pumpkins, and tombstones.  These simple thematic devices identify what platoon the team is in while giving the entire army its own flavor.

US Paratroopers (Pumpkin Platoon) by Jason Misuinas
Gasmask wearing Grenadiers by Jason Misuinas

Jason’s Pioneer Grenadiers are a very individualistic unit who’s base really causes them to stand out.  This unit is usually the lone infantry unit supporting his Panzerkompanie, but if he were to add more units, he could apply variations to the basing to both maintain uniformity, and give them some unique trait that he could use to help identify the unit.

One popular method for marking bases that I don’t think is very useful is to put a sticker on the bottom of the miniature’s base.  While marking the unit this way looks nice (because you don’t see the markings unless you look at the bottom of the base), it makes spot identifying the team impossible, and when it comes time to figure out who is who, you need to physically move the team.  This is usually not a big deal, but can occasionally cause troubles.  In a tournament I participated in an opponent needed to make sure that the command team that was between two platoons was his 2iC.  After picking the team up and checking out the bottom of it’s base, he put the team down around an inch closer to a neighboring platoon.  I don’t believe that he was intentionally trying to influence the game, but that fudge could have changed whether both units could link up to provide defensive fire or not.  This method is better than nothing, but not ideal.

Marking your bases is extremely important for your flames of war army.  It will help you keep the army organized, will keep you from forgetting to put teams down (I have forgotten an observer team on occasion), and will help maintain accurate gameplay which your opponent will appreciate.  On that last note, if  you are going to tournaments than this step is critical.  Nothing is quite as frustrating for an opponent in a tournament as when you can’t clearly tell them where platoon boundaries are.  Mark up your teams.  Its good for everyone!  🙂

Terrain for the new table: Urban Buildings

I firmly believe that complexity can be mitigated by efficient production in hobby projects.  The assembly line is your best friend.

A while ago I started tinkering with a system to create a series of urban buildings for Flames of War for city, or more dense sub-urban areas of Europe (perhaps including smallish cities such as Carentan, ect. ).  The premise of this terrain building methodology was to use foam-core to create the general form of the buildings (think a box with door, and window holes in it) and then add layers of applique detail as needed to achieve the results I wanted.

Today I stumbled across this article on TTGN.  I need to look into these buildings to see if they would fill the role that the foam-core would as described above.  They certainly would be more expensive, but would also be more sturdy, and would take a laborious step out of the process.

I am very interested in the laser-cut trend that is happening right now in gaming accessories.  These buildings may be a must have for my future terrain collection, or they may simply be the motivator for me to get off my ass and make my own buildings.

 

Tanksgiving – brief recap

Yesterday we finished our 3rd annual ‘Tanksgiving’ Flames of War mega-battle.  It was a great time, and I think all who participated had a pretty good game.  The allies (2 tankovy battalions, and 1 US 2nd armor company) faced off against the axis (3 panzerkompanies).  The Germans were able to secure the majority of the objectives early on, and held fast while the allies attacked their positions.  I held the left most flank and locked horns with my friend Kevin’s tankovy battalion.  The picture below summarizes how my game went…

Unfortunately my force was almost entirely hemmed into the corner of the table by an inconveniently placed river, and while my tanks were all able to stay in cover, fires from large Soviet guns took their toll.  I could have withstood these losses, as I was starting to whittle down one of the tank companies that I was facing.  The real catastrophe was when my mobile reserve of 5 Panzer IVh tanks took 4 longrange shots from several T34’s 76mm cannons, destroying 3 tanks, and causing the other two to flee the field!  In addition to being a hit to my morale, it robbed me of the unit I needed to capitalize on gains that my shooting had accomplished.*  Other long range fire, and a raid from allied fighter-bombers started to really take their toll against my line of StuGs.  Despite this mess, my recon detachment was able to advance quickly, take and hold an objective for practically the entire game!  They were my MVPs by far.  Sadly my artillery battery didn’t affect the game until late, but was able to slow down the Soviet advance.  My line folded when a second company of t34s appeared on my flank, and finished off what was remaining of my StuGs.

In the end the Germans held their ground and scored more points by holding, or denying objectives.  This was a very pyrrhic victory as there were tank carcasses everywhere, and one more turn would have delivered a substantial allied victory.  Thank you to my teammates Jason, and Scott and to my opponents Pete, Brian, and Kevin.  Extra thanks to Lexx for help setting up the table at his fantastic shop, Chicagoland Games!

 

*I feel like a weenie when I blame the dice but this was very much a magic moment… for the Soviets.  4 rolls to hit, all come up 6s.  My saving throws were 7+1d6, needing to beat 9AT.  1, 1, 1, 2.  Then the Kevin passes 4 firepower checks at 3+  Guh.  3 dead tanks, 1 bailed, 1 alive.  Morale check roll: 2.  The platoon’s surviving members flee the field.  Super.